The Perfect Hamantaschen Dough

photo: Shushy Turin-Shine;

photo: Shushy Turin-Shine;

It’s a little early, I know. But the weekend is fast approaching and with it comes an opportunity to commit to mastering the most whimsical of all baked goods: Hamantaschen!

So when Sarah Lasry posted a little preview of what I’ll be posting here NEXT week, our friend Shushy over at Cooking in Heels flipped head over her stilettos for this dough. Sarah promises it’s fabulous, even for those of us who have had problems with corners popping open and shapes looking too, well, UN- triangular. Yup, both Sushy and I confess freely to being hamantaschen challenged.

With thanks to Shushy, who stirred up a lot of expectation on her Instagram account (do check out her fabulous blog) and Sarah Lasry, one of my  ”4 Bloggers Dish: Passover” co-authors and go to recipe expert at Patchke Princess, here’s a dairy free (pareve) dough without a bit of margarine.

YAY for coconut oil!

For more ideas on hamantaschen fillings (chocolate and apricot and kid friendly jelly) and doughs (chocolate and anise and peanut butter), click my previous posts here and here.

Be sure to check back for another hamantschen recipe next week. I’m sworn to secrecy but I CAN tell you that it’s time for something savory- and we’ll have it right here for you.

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The Perfect Basic Hamantaschen Dough

18 hamantaschen

This recipe is courtesy of Sarah Lasry

If you would like to make this dough in advance: wrap it tightly in plastic wrap and keep in fridge. However the dough will be very hard from the coconut oil when you first remove from fridge, so you MUST leave it for a minimum of 2 hours on countertop to get to room temperature before using.

This recipe is non-dairy (pareve)


  • 3/4 cup coconut oil, room temp.
  • 2/3 cups sugar
  • 1 egg, room temp.
  • 1 tsp. pure vanilla extract
  • 2 tbsp. grated & finely chopped fresh lemon & orange rinds (the peel of about 1 large lemon & orange)
  • 2 1/4 cup flour
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • 3-4 tbsp. orange liqueur (I use Cointreau or you can use orange juice)


  1. Add the coconut oil and sugar to the bowl of an electric mixer. Using the whisk attachment, cream the sugar and oil till smooth (about 3 minutes)
  2. Add the egg, vanilla & citrus peel one at a time and whisk until combined.
  3. Slowly add the flour one cup at a time to mixer and whisk some more until a dough starts to form.
  4. Add the salt.
  5. Use a rubber spatula to scrape down the sides.
  6. Add the orange liqueur one tablespoon at a time and mix until the dough comes together easily. The dough should not be sticky but pliable and easily removable from the bowl. (You might need a little more liquid to achieve the desired consistency)
  7. At this point you can roll out the dough and fill with your favorite hamantaschen filling.
  8. Bake in 350 F pre-heated oven for about 13-15 minutes on a paper lined cookie sheet.
  9. The Hamantaschen are done when they a slightly golden at the edges and still soft to the touch.
  10. Remove from tray and let cool entirely on rack.
  11. Your Hamantaschen will be crispy with a little chewy bite.


Hamantaschen High and Low (For You and the Kiddos)

adults and kids chillin' together

Lots of laughter, wild costumes, and of course, the re-telling of the Purim victory tale, are all part of the Purim celebration. The hamantaschen, triangular cookies filled with jam, are always a key component.

And while I’ve seen these favorite cookies in bakeries at other times of the year, nothing signals Purim more delightfully than the tradition of baking these sweet treats in your own kitchen. Continue reading

Hamantaschen: Delicious No Matter How You Spell It

Hamantaschen are delectable, triangular filled cookies eaten on the holiday of Purim.

While some think that these tasty folded treats resemble little hats, they are referred to as Oznei Haman in Hebrew and Orecchie d’Aman in Italian, in both cases meaning Haman’s EARS, not hats! Continue reading