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EST. 2011 BY LIZ RUEVEN
Soba Noodle Salad with Miso Vinaigrette

Soba Noodle Salad with Miso Vinaigrette

Contributed by Melissa Roberts

Made from buckwheat flour, soba noodles have a strong, nutty flavor and served hot or cold, are a terrific base for a stir fry or salad. A good alternative to wheat pasta if you follow a gluten-free diet, not to mention lower in calories, be aware that many varieties do contain wheat flour.

This isn’t a problem from a culinary perspective; however, if gluten is an issue for you, check the labels carefully. Pure buckwheat noodles have a more intense flavor than their hybrid cousins.

 This soba salad can be served alongside grilled meat or fish, topped with soft tofu or slices of hard boiled egg for a boost of protein. It can also be transformed into a one dish meal, tossed with poached chicken (how to poach chicken tip to follow). A cool suppertime option when the days turn hot and steamy.

Photo: Liz Rueven; Soba undressed
Photo: Liz Rueven; Soba undressed

A final word on the following recipe. We could go on about the health benefits of the miso in the accompanying vinaigrette, and there are many, but this queen of all umami flavors makes up a dressing that will become the workhorse of your condiment shelf. It keeps well when prepared in advance and enlivens anything in need of a flavor boost, especially steamed veggies.

Soba Noodle Salad with Miso Vinaigrette

serves 6

Soba Noodle Salad with Miso Vinaigrette

Soba Noodles are a delicious, nutty base for salads and stir-fry dishes. If following a gluten-free diet, search ingredients for wheat in soba noodles. Buckwheat is a good gluten-free alternative.

This recipe was created by Melissa Roberts.

This recipe is Pareve, vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free (depending on the particular brand of soba noodles).

Ingredients

For dressing
    • 1 (1 inch) piece fresh peeled ginger
    • 3 tablespoons white miso
    • 2 tablespoons seasoned rice vinegar
    • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
    • 1 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
    • ½ cup canola oil plus 2 teaspoons for noodles
    • 3 tablespoons warm water
For salad
  • 1 ( 8 ounce*) package soba noodles (*Soba packages come in a variety of weights. Use any in the range of 8 to 12 ounces)
  • 6 radishes, thinly sliced, preferably with an adjustable blade slicer
  • ½ lb sugar snap peas, halved on the bias (or skip this step to keep things easier)
  • 4 cups baby spinach (3 oz)
  • 2 tablespoons toasted or black sesame seeds

Instructions

  1. Using a small food processor, finely chop ginger.
  2. Add miso, vinegar, soy sauce, and sesame oil and pulse to combine.
  3. Add ½ cup canola oil and run machine until dressing is emulsified.
  4. Add water, running machine to combine.
  5. At this point, the dressing can be kept chilled in an airtight container for up to 2 weeks.
  6. Add soba noodles to a large (5 to 6 quart) pot of boiling water until al dente (see package directions for time).
  7. Drain in a colander and run noodles under cold running water until cool. Drain completely and toss with remaining canola oil.
  8. Add noodles to a bowl with vegetables. Toss with enough dressing to coat and sprinkle with sesame seeds.

Notes

To make dressing by hand, finely chop ginger and add to a bowl, then whisk in miso, vinegar, soy, and sesame oil. Add canola oil in a stream, whisking until emulsified. Whisk in water.

Salad can be prepared, without dressing, up to 3 hours ahead. Toss with dressing before serving.

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