Why we Love those Lumpy Sunchokes



Katy Morris

Jerusalem artichokes are surprisingly misleading in more ways than one.

For starters, they’re not from Jerusalem and they’re not artichokes. And despite their knobby, uninviting look, this root vegetable magically transforms into a comforting, scrumptious and nutritious side dish.

Looking for an accompaniment to your Thanksgiving and meatless Monday meals? Try sunchokesContinue reading

Seasonal Snippet: Apples in Autumn


Photo: Emily Hamilton Laux

Photo: Emily Hamilton Laux

Katy Morris

Apples are always the apple of our eye but never more so than in autumn. They’re healthy and delectably ubiquitous in an array of dishes ranging from crisp salads, hot ciders and smooth sauces to savory desserts.

Here’s why we love ‘em and what you need to know to take advantage of this abundant autumn bounty. Continue reading

Seasonal Snippet: Winter Squash in Autumn


by Katy Morris

All photos: Emily H. Laux. Find more of Emily’s photos on Instagram @emilyhlaux

As the piles of vibrant summer produce phase out at your local farmers’ market, in roll the heaps of tough looking gourds. And as sweater weather arrives, we’re turning to comforting casseroles, soups, stews and curries starring winter squash of all kinds, waiting to be paired with warming spices of nutmeg, cinnamon and ginger.

Don’t be intimidated by their rough looking appearances! Prepped, seasoned and paired with the right ingredients, you’ll easily be able to create an array of hearty, sweet crowd-pleasers for Sukkot and beyond.

Watch for Marissa Latshaw’s creamy dairy-free Butternut Squash and Apple Soup later this week.

Here’s the dish on Squash and why we love them so: Continue reading

Seasonal Snippet: Eggplant & Moroccan Eggplant Salad


Photo: Liz Rueven

Photo: Liz Rueven

Katy Morris

Are you still swooning over summer’s abundance of fresh bounty at your farmers’ market?

One of our favorites just made its seasonal debut, and luckily, this versatile fruit will keep us busy in the kitchen right into autumn. When it comes to August aubergines, we’re all in. Continue reading

Seasonal Snippet: About that Bowl of Cherries


photo: Liz Rueven

photo: Liz Rueven

Katy Morris

When life gives us a bowl of them, we couldn’t be cheerier.

They’re called CHERRIES because they originally hail from the ancient Turkish town of Cerasus. They’ll jazz up savory kugel, add perfect pink juiciness to granola parfaits, and on hot summer days, are best eaten straight out of hand.

Here’s everything you need to know – from tip of the stem to center of the pit – about one of our favorite stone fruits: cherries. Continue reading

It’s Strawberry Season but Don’t Blink!


Photo: Emily Hamilton Laux

Photo: Emily Hamilton Laux

Katy Morris

Forgive the sense of urgency but we suggest you snatch up some succulent strawberries as quickly as possible. The best ones aren’t playing hard to get, they really are!

Here in CT, strawberry season happens so quickly that if you don’t get out to the fields over a two-three week period (and it could be shorter) you’ll miss your opportunity to pick your own. (see link below to find farms with strawberry fields throughout the U. S.).

Continue reading

Seasonal Snippet & Minty Salmon Cuke Rolls

Photo: Leaf and Ardor

Photo: Leaf and Ardor

Katy Morris

We’re kicking off our warm weather Seasonal Snippets column with lots of minty inspiration and a gluten-free, low fat recipe for Mint Salmon Cucumber Rolls.  With mint‘s uplifting and invigorating scent and all-around culinary versatility, it is a seasonal shoe-in!

While in ancient times, mint leaves were scattered on the floors of synagogues and home foyers as a symbol of hospitality, these days we prefer them on our plates and in our glasses to perk up everything from morning tea to savory dinners and cooling desserts. Here’s what you need to know. Continue reading

Seasonal Snippet: Collards & Nutty Pate Wrap

The Stand- Curried almond pate with Gilbertie's pea shoots and red peppers

Contributed by Katy Morris; Photos- Liz Rueven

Collard greens are a staple in southern cuisine, but vegetarians and kosher keepers have generally steered clear of them since they have traditionally been paired with ingredients we don’t eat. Luckily, these nutritious greens have made their way nationwide and into lots of creative vegan and vegetarian dishes (see our vegan and gluten-free Curry Collard Wrap, below).  Bursting with flavor and impressively versatile,  we love collard greens! Continue reading

Seasonal Snippet: Sunny Southern Blood Oranges


Contributed by Katy Morris

photos: Isabelle Cossart

You don’t have to wait until spring to enjoy some sunshine. The cream of the winter citrus crop is at its peak right now and we’ve fallen hard for blood oranges!

Their bright citrus flavor makes them an ideal partner with roasted winter root vegetables and they offer a warm burst of happy color along with some little known health benefits.

After Liz discovered the “impossibly magenta oranges” from Isabelle Cossart’s Orange Orchard at NYC’s Print Restaurant a couple of years ago, we reached out to the southern organic citrus farmer herself to get all the juicy details about blood oranges. And when she told us that “The only thing I put on my trees is sunshine, ladybugs, rain and TLC!” we just had to share this with our readers.

Isabelle Cossart, organic farmer

Isabelle Cossart, organic farmer

How are they different than regular oranges?

Blood oranges are smaller, less acidic versions of regular oranges that according to Cossart, are “sweet with a tinge of tartness and a lot of floral hints like lavender and hibiscus.” The difference may be hard to spot on the outside, but peel away the skin of a blood orange and you will be greeted by a radiating ruby-tinted flesh that clearly sets it apart from varieties like navels.

Blood oranges, which are a hybrid of pomelos and tangerines, also have a higher percentage of vitamin C than regular oranges.

What’s with the crazy red color?

The color-intensifying driver that makes these vibrant beauties blush is anthocyanin, an antioxidant compound found in other red fruits like red cabbages and grapes. As the nights get cooler in typically warm areas like the southern US and the Mediterranean coast, more anthocynanins are produced and the rose color deepens.

Good to know: these compounds are actually cancer fighters and also help prevent heart disease.

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So when are they at their best?

There are two main types of blood oranges: Moro, which is at its best from December through March, and Tarocco, which peaks from January to May – so, now!

And even though the cool nights are perfect for winter citrus, farmers like Cossart have to keep a close eye on them before a dreaded deep freeze hits – check out the loads of harvested citrus they scrambled to save just a couple of weeks ago by covering them with insulating plastic bags!

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What is the best way to use them in dishes?

They are perfect accompaniments to earthy root vegetables and make great additions to fresh greens (try tossing some in this Roasted Beet Salad with Goat Cheese Mousse). You can also make mouthwatering, eye-catching juice with them (keep in mind that because of their sweetness, the juice will ferment more quickly than regular OJ) or even to make this great raw, vegan, pareve Blood Orange Cheesecake.

“I juice them or use them in spinach and endive salads,” says Cossart. “I also freeze them as popsicles.” She also recommends jazzing up mimosas to add some beautiful and unexpected color with blood orange juice instead of regular OJ.

How to store them?

Blood oranges will be fine out on the counter if eaten within a few days, but to make them last up to two weeks you should pop them in the drawer in your fridge.


How can I get some of Isabelle’s blood oranges?

Contact Isabelle’s Orchard  for blood oranges, sugar navels, Louisiana sweet oranges and ruby red grapefruit as well. Go old school and pick up the phone to order. They like to hear human voices when taking the orders.

Pricing Details:  Kosher Like Me readers are invited to use reference code “SNIPPET” to receive a $5 discount on orders of at least 20 pounds (or roughly 25-30 fruits)! Please share this deal with your friends, too.

If you’re hooked on buying the freshest, organic citrus directly from the farmer, be sure to sign up for their New Fruit Notifications so you can be ahead of the curve on seasonal citrus throughout the year.

How else can I get my hands on them?

You can also get Moro blood oranges from local Whole Foods and Balducci’s. Be sure to pick fruit that is heavy for it’s size (more juice). Note that little blemishes or brown areas on the skin will not affect the flavor but avoid any fruit with spongy spots.


Bite-size recap on Blood Oranges:

  • What: Blood oranges are a winter citrus fruit originally from the southern coasts of Spain and Italy that are sweeter and have a hint of floral notes and are chockfull of antioxidants
  • Where: They are now growing in warm climates in the US, like California, Louisiana and Florida
  • When: NOW! Blood oranges thrive roughly from December through early spring
  • What to look for: Look for ones heavy for their size; don’t get caught up on minor blemishes but watch out for very bruised ones
  • How to use: For juice, out of hand, in salads, and paired with winter vegetables like in the fennel recipe below!
  • Storage: Refrigerate if you will not be eating right away

Roasted Parsnip & Pear Salad with Spiced Glaze

photo: Rachel Carr

photo: Rachel Carr

Contributed by Katy Morris

We know it can be frustrating once the temperatures drop and your local farmers’ markets may seem, well, a little lack luster. But there are some interesting vegetables that thrive in the cold weather, resulting in a surprisingly bountiful winter harvest for locavores who know how to bring out the best of these ingredients. Continue reading