photo: Liz Rueven

photo: Liz Rueven

Do you love to go apple picking as the seasons shift and the days suddenly become cool and breezy again?  If you’re like us, you shlep home an overflowing bushel (or two) after a gleeful day in the orchards and then wonder, now what?

We turned to Ali Gutwaks, President and Personal Chef of AliBabka for applicious inspiration and she pointed us to her glossy, moist vegan (non-dairy and pareve) French Apple Tart.

She loves making this for holidays and Autumn gatherings and told us that, that ‘this dessert is sweet and tart all at the same time and has a fabulous texture with the use of these specific apples. The crust is foolproof!”

In 2012, Ali was featured in the Wall Street Journal as a kosher chef navigating non-kosher cooking school at ICE. We especially like the part about her grilling her classmates to gauge tastes and textures that she was cooking but not tasting because she keeps kosher! Read the post here.

We’d love to know what you do with your overflowing pecks of apples. We’d also love to know if any of you know what a PECK is without checking Wickepedia! Comment, below, please!

And, we’d like to give a super special shout-out and virtual hug to our friend, Carrie, who graciously agreed to test this recipe for us when she noticed that Liz was simply too busy to bake before her quickie trip to visit her family in Israel for Rosh HaShanah. What a friend! Take a look at Carrie’s vintage inspired handmade jewelry at The Queens Beads. We love her style and think you will, too.

French Apple Tart

12 servings

French Apple Tart

This apple tart takes full advantage of the fruit of the season! The combination of apples provides great texture and more nuanced flavor.

This recipe is courtesy of Chef Alison Barnett Gutwaks AKA AliBabka.

Recipe is pareve (dairy free) and vegan.

Ingredients

  • Pie Shell (see recipe below)
  • 2 Lemons (1 1/2 tsp. lemon zest and 2 Tbs. Juice)
  • 4 Granny Smith Apples (2 lbs), peeled and cored (Reserve 2 for top)
  • 4 Golden Delicious Apples (2 lbs), peeled and cored (Reserve 1 for top)
  • 6 Tbs. Earth Balance
  • 1/2 C. + 2 Tbs. Sugar
  • 1 1/2 tsp. Vanilla Extract
  • 1/4 tsp. Ground Nutmeg
  • 1/3 C. Apricot Preserves

Instructions

  1. Make pie crust as directed (see recipe below) and press the dough in a tart pan with a removable bottom.
  2. Bake for 20 minutes with pie weights on top of the crust.
  3. In a large saute pan, melt 4 Tbs. of Earth Balance over medium high heat.
  4. Add sliced apples and cook for 5 minutes. Cover, reduce heat to medium and cook 1 minutes, until the apples are very tender.
  5. Stir in lemon peel and juice,1/2 C. sugar, vanilla, and nutmeg.
  6. Cook, stirring frequently, 25-30 minutes until puree is very thick and reduced to about 2 1/4 Cups.
  7. Cool apple mixture and set aside.
  8. Preheat oven to 375.
  9. Thinly slice remaining reserved apples.
  10. Spoon puree in tart shell and arrange apple slices, overlapping in concentric circles on the top of the puree.
  11. Melt the remaining 2 Tbs. Earth Balance and brush apple slices with the "butter" and sprinkle with the 2 Tbs. Sugar.
  12. Bake for 45-50 minutes until the apples are tender when pierced with a knife. Cool tart and remove side of pan and cool completely.
  13. When cool, brush apple slices with preserves. If preserves aren't thin enough, add the preserves and a little water in a saucepan till slightly warm and spreadable.
http://kosherlikeme.com/recipes/celebrate-autumn-with-this-french-apple-tart

Best Dairy Free Pie Crust

1 pie crust

This pie crust is courtesy of Chef Alison Barnett Gutwaks AKA AliBabka.

Find her recipe for French Apple Tart, above.

Pie crust is perfectly pareve (dairy free) and vegan.

Ingredients

  • 1 ¼ C. Flour
  • ¼ t. Salt
  • 6 T. Earth Balance Shortening
  • 3-5 T. Ice Water

Instructions

  1. Process the flour, salt, and shortening in a blender or with a pastry blender.
  2. Sprinkle in ice water till a ball is formed.
  3. Refrigerate for 30 minutes or overnight.
  4. Follow instructions found above in French Apple Tart recipe.

Notes

Chef Ali suggests making more than one pie crust at a time and freezing what you don't bake. She says they freeze perfectly.

http://kosherlikeme.com/recipes/celebrate-autumn-with-this-french-apple-tart

 

Photo: Robin Selden, Marcia Selden Catering & Event Planning

Photo: Robin Selden, Marcia Selden Catering & Event Planning

Contributed by Marcia Selden Catering & Event Planning

You say tomato…we say Make a Galette! The tomato bounty of summer continues through the end of September, and it’s only right to take full advantage of it.

We prefer a galette to a pie or tart because it’s free form deliciousness looks great no matter what’s inside. Imperfect shapes and mess ups are A-OKAY!  This rustic tomato galette is awesome as an appetizer or side dish and great served with a salad for a light dinner.

Liz adds: PERFECT for eating outside in your Sukkah or at your next Autumn picnic by the crashing waves or in your own backyard. Looking for something new to add to your Yom Kippur break-the-fast buffet? This is an easy one!

Rustic Roasted Tomato & Goat Cheese Galette

4-6 servings

This Roasted Tomato and Goat Cheese Galette is a grand way to bid farewell to end of season, local tomatoes. Use this pastry dough for other creations you dream up as you chose your favorite veggies and cheese.

Thank you, Marcia Selden Catering, Stamford, CT for this recipe.

This recipe is dairy.

Ingredients

    Pastry Dough
  • 2 C unbleached All-Purpose or Whole-Wheat Pastry Flour
  • 1/4 t Sea Salt
  • 12 T Cold Butter, cut into small pieces
  • 1/3 to ½ C Ice Water as needed
  • The Filling
  • 1 t roughly chopped fresh Oregano
  • 1/3 C fresh Chopped Chives
  • 1 Onion, sliced thin, sautéed in butter and extra virgin olive oil until golden brown
  • 10 oz Goat Cheese, crumbled (refrigerate til ready to use)
  • 1 lb Tomatoes, thinly sliced (we like heirlooms)
  • 1 t Thyme Leaves
  • 2 T Olive Oil, plus extra for brushing on the tart dough
  • Sea Salt & Freshly Ground Black Pepper, to taste
  • Optional – Parmesan Cheese
  • ½ C Pesto – homemade or store bought

Instructions

    To make the dough
  1. Mix the flour and salt together in the bowl of a mixer with a paddle attachment.
  2. Cut in the butter, leaving some pea-sized chunks. Sprinkle the ice water over the flour mixture by the tablespoon until you can bring the dough together into a ball.
  3. Press it into a disk and refrigerate. Let the dough chill for 1 hour.
  4. Pre-heat oven to 425 degrees F.
  5. To assemble the galette
  6. Roll the dough out on a lightly floured counter into a 14-inch irregular circle about 1/8-inch thick. Transfer to a greased or oiled sheet pan, dusted with flour.
  7. Spread the pesto over the center of the dough, leaving an inch border.
  8. Spread the onions over the pesto.
  9. Spread the goat cheese in the center of the pastry circle, and sprinkle with oregano and thyme. Arrange the tomatoes in an overlapping pattern.
  10. Season with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper and drizzle with extra virgin olive oil.
  11. Fold the edges of the dough over the tomatoes, folding the dough every inch or so. Lightly brush the dough with olive oil and sprinkle, lightly with salt. Dust with parmesan (optional).
  12. Bake for 20-30 minutes at 425 degrees or until the crust is golden brown on the edges.

Notes

This free-form galette is easy to transport and delicious at room temp alongside a leafy green salad.

http://kosherlikeme.com/recipes/rustic-roasted-tomato-goat-cheese-galette

Photo: Liz Rueven

Photo: Liz Rueven

Melissa Roberts

Noodle kugel usually finds itself alongside the bagels at a Yom Kippur break fast. Kugel, sweetened with fruit and sugar, symbolizes a wish for a sweet year ahead. There are many variations on this theme and the following recipe provides tradition with a twist on the familiar.

A cottage cheese and sour cream base is blended with eggs, sugar, vanilla and lemon zest into a smooth custard, an extra step, but one that lends a creamy base. Next, the kugel is studded with plump golden raisins and apple, a combination with hints of the fall season ahead.

But there’s more. Because apples pair well with fennel, the sugar is whizzed with fennel seed, lacing the kugel with a faint licorice flavor.

Apple & Fennel Noodle Kugel

8-10 servings

Apple & Fennel Noodle Kugel

Dairy noodle kugel (pudding) is a satisfying addition to any brunch buffet. But it is most often associated with a celebratory break-the-fast meal. Decadently creamy and filling, this kugel points to Autumn with the inclusion of apples and fennel.

This recipe was contributed by Melissa Roberts.

This kugel is dairy.

Ingredients

  • 2 Golden Delicious apples (1 lb total)
  • ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon fennel seed
  • 12 ounces dried egg noodles
  • ¾ cup golden raisins
  • 5 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided, plus more for greasing dish
  • 1 (1 lb) container sour cream
  • 1 (1 lb) container small curd cottage cheese (4% fat)
  • 1 cup 2% or whole milk
  • 3 large eggs
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla
  • 1 ½ teaspoons finely grated lemon zest
  • ¾ teaspoon salt

Instructions

  1. Position rack in center of oven and preheat to 350F.
  2. Generously grease a 3 ½ quart shallow (2 inch deep) baking dish with some butter.
  3. Peel apples, halve, and core. Cut each half into thirds, then thinly slice crosswise.
  4. Combine sugar and fennel seed in a food processor. Run machine until fennel breaks down (it won’t be finely ground, but break most of the fennel into pieces and infuse the sugar). Measure out 2 tablespoons and set aside. Leave remaining sugar in machine.
  5. Bring a 5 to 6 quart pot of water to a boil.
  6. Measure out 1 cup boiling water and combine with raisins. Let steep.
  7. Add 1 tablespoon of salt to pot, then cook noodles until al dente. Drain in a colander, then return to warm pot and add 3 tablespoons of the butter, tossing until noodles are coated.
  8. Combine sour cream, cottage cheese, milk eggs, vanilla, zest and salt in food processor with fennel sugar.
  9. Process until smooth.
  10. Add to pot with noodles.
  11. Drain raisins (discard water), then stir in sour cream mixture , raisins, and apples with noodles until combined.
  12. Transfer to buttered dish. Dot top with remaining 2 tablespoons butter and sprinkle with reserved fennel sugar.
  13. Cover dish with foil and bake until kugel is beginning to set but still slightly jiggly in center, 45 minutes to 1 hour hour.
  14. Remove foil and continue to bake until top is golden brown, 10 to 15 minutes more. Let stand 15 minutes before serving.
http://kosherlikeme.com/recipes/apple-fennel-noodle-kugel

Originally Posted in “Apple & Fennel Noodle Kugel
Photo: Liz Rueven

Photo: Liz Rueven

We’re still swooning over the house cured Alaskan salmon we enjoyed at Moss Cafe in Riverdale, NY a couple of weeks ago (watch for the resto review coming soon). So we think it’s high time we provide you with Chef Jonathan Mendez‘s easy recipe just on time for you to serve it at your break fast after Yom Kippur.

Or just stash it away for the next time you want to make something to really wow your family and guests.

Be sure to plan ahead as you need to make this 48 hours in advance to allow this salmon to cure.

Moss Cafe is a farm to table, kosher, dairy restaurant in Riverdale, NY. They have seasonal catering menus available at this time. Not up for curing your own salmon? You can order it from Moss, along with plenty of other inventive salads and house made sweet treats.  Click here to see what they are up to.

Cured Gravlax

Making your own cured salmon at home is super easy! Be sure to allow 48 for the salmon to cure.

This recipe is courtesy of Chef Jonathan Mendez of Moss Cafe, Riverdale, NY

This recipe is pareve (fish)

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs salmon, skin on, pin bones removed (preferably sockeye)
  • Zest of 2 lemons
  • 1/3 cup salt
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • Fresh dill

Instructions

  1. Zest the lemon directly into the sugar, this preserves the aromatic oils in the zest.
  2. Combine the lemon sugar with the salt and liberally season the flesh and skin of the fish with this curing mixture.
  3. Place fish flesh side down in a non-reactive container, and cover with an air-tight seal.The curing mixture will dissolve into a brine.
  4. Cure in the refrigerator for 18-24 hours
  5. Rinse the cure off with cold water, and pat dry with paper towels.
  6. Place a lot of fresh dill (you can substitute dry if fresh isn't available) on the flesh of the fish.
  7. Wrap in plastic wrap, and place in a container.
  8. Place something heavy (10+ lbs) on top of fish in order to compress the flesh overnight in refridgerator.

Notes

You'll need a 10 pound weight to compress the fish as it's curing. Use lots of cans of beans or a tall stack of books.

Be sure to have a VERY sharp knife ready to carve into paper thin slices before serving.

http://kosherlikeme.com/recipes/how-to-cure-salmon-in-your-home

Originally Posted in “How to Cure Salmon at Home
Photo: Liz Rueven

Photo: Liz Rueven

Melissa Roberts

A platter of braised brisket is the centerpiece of many Jewish holiday meals. Here is a recipe that’s basic enough to accompany various side dishes, yet different enough to add something new to the table. The sauce is a combination of heady allspice and cinnamon, wine and tomato, braised with the beef into a rich succulent sauce.

 A little Brisket 101:  Brisket can be found two different ways: first cut and second cut. First cut has a single side of exterior fat that is relatively lean. Second cut is evenly marbled throughout and has moister, more succulent, meat. Either one works well in this recipe.

Note: If brisket is featured on your holiday menu, it’s best to plan ahead. De-fatting and cutting the meat into neat slices is much easier when chilled overnight.

Red Wine & Tomato Brisket

8-10 servings

Red Wine & Tomato Brisket

This brisket recipe hearkens back to many of the traditional recipes we grew up with. But here, Melissa Roberts adds warm notes with spices that change the flavors just enough to surprise.

If brisket is featured on your holiday menu, it’s best to plan ahead. De-fatting and cutting the meat into neat slices is much easier when chilled overnight.

This recipe is meat.

Ingredients

  • 4 tablespoons olive or vegetable oil
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 (5 ½ to 6 lb) first or second cut brisket
  • 1 very large onion, halved and sliced
  • 3 fat cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon ground allspice
  • 1 ½ teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 2 cups red wine, preferably light bodied such as Pinot Noir
  • 1 ½ cups chicken stock or low sodium chicken broth
  • 1 (28 ounce can) crushed tomatoes
  • ¼ cup honey
  • 2 (4 inch) sprigs fresh thyme

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350F with rack in middle.
  2. Heat 3 tablespoons oil in a large roasting pan, straddled across 2 burners, over medium high heat until oil shimmers.
  3. Pat brisket dry and season all over with 1 teaspoon salt. Brown meat (fat side down first if using first cut) on both sides, 3 to 5 minutes per side. Transfer to a large plate or baking pan.
  4. Add remaining tablespoon oil, reduce heat to medium, and add onions, stirring occasionally until they begin to soften, 8 to 10 minutes.
  5. Add garlic and spices, and cook, stirring, until fragrant, 1 minute.
  6. Add wine and boil until reduced by half, then stir in chicken broth, tomatoes, honey, thyme, and 1/2 teaspoon each salt and pepper.
  7. Bring to a simmer and return brisket to pan. Cover tightly with heavy duty or a double layer of foil and braise until meat is fork tender, 3 hours.
  8. Transfer meat to a board and slice across the grain. Skim off any excess fat from surface of sauce (if chilling brisket overnight, remove solidified fat the next day), discard thyme sprigs, and season sauce with salt to taste.
  9. Return sliced meat to sauce before serving.

Notes

Cooks’ note: Reheat sliced meat in sauce, covered, in a low 300F oven until heated through.

http://kosherlikeme.com/recipes/red-wine-tomato-brisket-with-a-twist

Originally Posted in “Red Wine & Tomato Brisket with a Twist
Photo: Liz Rueven

Photo: Liz Rueven

Pomegranates, or rimonim in Hebrew, are one of the most recognizable and highly symbolic fruits in Jewish culture. We include them in our Rosh HaShanah recipes to bring good luck in the coming year. But there’s plenty more to know about them. 

Check out my exploration of pomegranates, including how to knock those jewel-like arils out of their leathery skin, by clicking over to the Nosher. You’ll find plenty of other great holiday dishes there inluding my favorite Honey Whole Wheat Challah recipe by Nosher editor and challah baker extraordinaire, Shannon Sarna.

Originally Posted in “Pomegranate Honey Glazed Chicken

sangria RRH

Katy Morris

Our favorite ladies of Leaf & Ardor Tea Co. never stop brewing!

They’ve concocted a selection of refreshing, unique and healthy new tea blends that “mimic the moods of summer”. Drop these easy to use tea saches into a pitcher of cold water for the perfect iced drink. Leave the sachet to brew (see how gorgeous they are?!) for a morning pick-me-up or evening cocktail.  We’re sharing all the chill news plus recipes today.

Don’t miss our great give-away later this week! We’ve reached out to our our fave glassblowers at Simon Pearce and we’re including an elegant pitcher to serve these cold brews from. Fruity sangria or fragrant tea? You chose! You’l be serving it in style, either way.

photo

Co-owners Connie Pappas & Cristina Copersino recently reminded us that “it’s pretty much impossible to over-steep tea when cold-brewing [their blends], because the cold water extracts less caffeine from the tea, making it perfect for a summer afternoon without caffeine jitters. Hot water and cold water create different chemical reactions when they interact with the tea and herbs so the tasting notes will be slightly different depending on whether you hot brew or cold brew the tea.”

 

So what are these great new blends we are swooning over? Liz met with the owners for an afternoon tasting at Leaf and Ardor’s studio in CT. Here are her thoughts on the thirst-quenching and unique flavors:

sangria w_ 2 glasses 2

“Solstice Sun”: This is a unique take on English Breakfast black tea that combines the summery flavors of invigorating orange zest, lemongrass and fresh rose petals. This is a delicately nuanced black tea blend with subtle undertones. Watch the rose petals turn fuschia when they hit the water. Be sure to serve this in a glass pitcher. Your guests will love the colors of the vibrant petals. Try throwing in some fresh fruit to add a delicate natural sweetness without added sugars.

 

“Ruby Rose Hips” is an herbal blend of rose hips, hibiscus and lemongrass that offers a berry-fruity and slightly tart taste. Connie & Cristina added that it is also a “potent source of vitamins and antioxidants, especially vitamin C.” Hibiscus and rose hips tint this brew a vibrant hot pink- naturally!  Use a chopstick to stir in agave or local honey to balance the tartness.

 

The “Moroccan Mint” is the perfect fusion of uplifting peppermint, spearmint and green tea leaves that would be ideal for a restorative afternoon mojito or mint julep on the back porch. Cristina and Connie recommend adding a touch of agave and sliced lemons for some added flavor. Too lazy to snip mint leaves from your garden? This is the perfect solution.

 

Want some extra tips?

Be sure to check out our post on cold-brewing tips from the experts. We love Leaf and Ardor because we trust all of their blends are organic, pure and free of any of those extra flavorings and extracts . This is what truly sets their products apart from the rest.

SS Smoothie, KF bowls 2

All new blends are currently available on Leaf and Ardor’s website. Be sure to order soon because they are offering free shipping on all of their cold brews through September 21st using the code “COLDBREW”. CT readers: You may shop these teas at The Pantry in Fairfield, CT and a few other great outlets in the nutmeg state. Check Leaf and Ardor’s site for more info.

Love these porcelain tea bowls made by CT ceramicist Karen Ford? They’re on Leaf and Ardor‘s site, too.

Check these recipes below and chill during these steamy days of August.

Be sure to check back (or subscribe by clicking into the SIGN ME UP bar to the right) for a super give-away later this week. We’ve got a bold, contemporary, hand-blown glass pitcher from Simon Pearce to serve these bright cold teas in.  Of course, we’ll be tossing in plenty of great teas to brew, too!

All photos shot by Connie Pappas and Cristina Copersino and are courtesy of Leaf and Ardor.

Leaf and Ardor Ruby Rose Hips Sangria

4 servings

Leaf and Ardor Ruby Rose Hips Sangria

Leaf and Ardor's Cold Brew Teas combine with dry rose and peach brandy to make naturally sweet and refreshing sangria.

Recipe is courtesy of Leaf and Ardor Teas.

Ingredients

  • 1 ½ cups cold brewed Leaf & Ardor Ruby Rose Hips
  • 3 cups dry rosé wine
  • ¼ cup peach brandy/liquor
  • 12 ripe pitted cherries, sliced in half
  • ½ cup fresh raspberries
  • 1/2 sweet chopped purple plum
  • ½ ripe yet firm chopped nectarine
  • 1/8 - ¼ cup agave to taste

Instructions

  1. Add 1 Leaf & Ardor Ruby Rose Hips cold brew sachet to 4 cups cold water. Allow to steep 6 - 8 hours or overnight.
  2. To the tea add rosé wine, chopped fruit and brandy. Mix well. Taste and add a small amount of agave. (We found it needed only 1/8th of a cup or agave, as the sweetness of the fruit begins to infuse while chilling.)
  3. Serve in a wine glass or frosted glass of your choice. Garnish with lemon or lime wedge.

Notes

Feel free to sub in any seasonal fruit for summer berries in this recipe. Chose fruit that you love and it will be spot on!

http://kosherlikeme.com/recipes/cold-brewed-teas-cocktail-brews

Leaf and Ardor Solstice Sun Smoothie

2 generous servings

Leaf and Ardor Solstice Sun Smoothie

Ready for change in your breakfast or snack routine? This Solstice Sun Smoothie, courtesy of Leaf and Ardor, will add a bright new idea to your mealtime.

This recipe is non-dairy, pareve. Dairy yogurt may be substituted if preferred.

Ingredients

  • 2/3 cup plain coconut yogurt
  • ½ cup cold brewed Leaf & Ardor Solstice Sun
  • 1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon cashew butter
  • 1 - 2 teaspoons honey (or 1/2 - 1 teaspoon agave) to taste
  • ½ ripe banana (reserve some for garnish)
  • 2 small figs (reserve 1 for garnish)
  • 1 tablespoon shelled hemp seeds
  • 1 tablespoon ground flax seeds
  • Almonds for garnish

Instructions

  1. Place 1 Solstice Sun tea sachet in 3 cups cold water, brew overnight.
  2. Add yogurt, tea, 1 fig, 1/2 banana, cashew butter, hemp, flax to a blender or vitamix.
  3. Blend well, till smooth. Taste and add sweetener as desired.
  4. Pour into small bowls and garnish with sliced figs, banana and almonds.

Notes

The Solstice Sun Smoothie Bowl is also great with a topping of coconut, granola, and sunflower seeds. You may also add things such as bee pollen, cacao nibs, and hemp seeds.

http://kosherlikeme.com/recipes/cold-brewed-teas-cocktail-brews

Originally Posted in “Cold Brewed Teas & Cocktail Brews
Photo: Robin Selden, Marcia Selden Catering

Photo: Robin Selden, Marcia Selden Catering

Contributed by Marcia Selden Catering

We love this healthier version of the classic breaded and fried rollatini. It’s lighter in calories but still packs a heavy flavor punch with ricotta, basil, fresh lemon and nutmeg filling. It works as an appetizer or an entrée and is the perfect summer dish.

Eggplants are actually a fruit, just like tomatoes—and they’re part of the Nightshade family, which also includes Tobacco! Eggplants contain the highest amount of nicotine found in any vegetable! But fear not—you’d have to eat 20 lbs of eggplant to ingest the same amount of nicotine as a cigarette. Eggplant is also a great source of fiber and is very low in calories at just 35 per cup.

Eggplant Rollatini the Healthier Way

Eggplant Rollatini the Healthier Way

Here's a great low- fat version of Eggplant Rollatini using peak of summer eggplant and tomatoes.

This sauce can also be enjoyed over grilled chicken, fish, or over a big bowl of your favorite pasta.

This recipe is courtesy of Marcia Selden Catering, Stamford, CT.

This Eggplant Rollatini is dairy, vegetarian and gluten-free.

Ingredients

    Roasted Tomato Sauce
  • 2 lbs Fresh Tomatoes
  • 8 Cloves Garlic, Peeled and chopped
  • 4 tbs Olive Oil
  • Kosher Salt and Freshly Ground Pepper
  • Eggplant
  • 3 Medium Eggplants, sliced lengthwise to yield 12 slices
  • 1 ½ C Ricotta
  • ½ C grated Parmesan
  • 1 C Finely Shredded Mozzarella
  • Zest of ½ Lemon
  • ½ tsp Freshly Grated Nutmeg
  • 1 tbs Fresh Basil, chopped
  • ¼ tsp Salt
  • ¼ tsp Freshly Ground Black Pepper

Instructions

    Make the Roasted Tomato Sauce
  1. Pre-heat the oven to 350 degrees and line a 9X13 baking dish with aluminum foil.
  2. Chop the tomatoes roughly and spread them in the baking dish.
  3. In a bowl, combine the chopped garlic, olive oil and salt and pepper and pour evenly over the tomatoes.
  4. Bake for 2-3 hours, until their edges blacken and the juices are reduced. Pour the roasted tomatoes into a food processor and pulse 2-3 times.
  5. Prepare the eggplant
  6. Preheat a grill pan or outdoor barbeque.
  7. Salt the eggplant slices and place in a colander to drain for 20 minutes.
  8. Dry by blotting with paper towels.
  9. Brush with olive oil, and sprinkle with salt and fresh cracked pepper.
  10. Grill for about 5 minutes each side, then set aside to cool.
  11. Mix together the ricotta, parmesan, mozzarella, basil, lemon zest, parmesan and nutmeg in a bowl.
  12. Lay the eggplant on a sheet pan and spread one rounded tablespoon of ricotta mixture along one edge.
  13. Roll up the eggplant and place in an oven safe dish.
  14. Drizzle with the Roasted Tomato Sauce and sprinkle with freshly grated parmesan cheese.
  15. Bake for 15 minutes at 350 degrees until cheese bubbles.
http://kosherlikeme.com/recipes/eggplant-rollatini-the-healthier-way

 

 

Originally Posted in “Eggplant Rollatini the Healthier Way
Photo: Liz Rueven

Photo: Liz Rueven

We always appreciate a healthy recipe with a twist and this vegan, gluten-free Black Eyed Pea Falafel is just that. 

For you falafel traditionalists, this might require that you step out of your legume box.  It’s not a comittment, just a tasty experiment worth trying. Just be sure to follow the soaking instructions. You’ll love the slightly spicy kick and healthy green flecks from a load of cilantro, parsley, mint leaves and scallions.

For those with gluten sensitivities, black eyed peas are gluten free in their dry state. Do not use canned beans.

Thank you, Back 40 Kitchen in Greenwich, CT, for this delightful twist on one of our favorites. To read more about Back 40 Kitchen and why we love it so, scroll down or click here for our review.

Watermelon radishes in chalk by Deidre Mannix at Back 40 Kitchen

Watermelon radishes in chalk by Deidre Mannix at Back 40 Kitchen

Black Eyed Pea Falafel

Approximately 20 falafel balls, one oz. each

This falafel recipe is a fun twist on the traditional. Black eyed peas lend a slightly different texture than chick peas and plenty of chopped herbs result in pretty green flecks.

Thank you, Back 40 Kitchen, for sharing this recipe.

This recipe is vegan, pareve (diary free) and gluten-free.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups black eyed peas soaked for 24 hours
  • 1teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1teaspoon ground coriander seed
  • 1/2 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground white pepper
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 1 cup cilantro leaves
  • 1/2 cup parsley leaves
  • 1/2 cup mint leaves
  • 1/2 cup scallion
  • 1 lemon zested

Instructions

  1. Drain soaked peas and pulse with garlic and spices in food processor until coarsely ground
  2. Add herb and finish processing until finely ground
  3. Chill and reserve
  4. Roll into one ounce balls
  5. Fry at 350 in coconut oil until crisp
  6. Season with salt to taste

Notes

Be sure to follow soaking instructions. Black eyed peas need to be soaked 24 hours in advance of preparing falafel.

http://kosherlikeme.com/recipes/black-eyed-pea-falafel-recipe

 

Originally Posted in “Black Eyed Pea Falafel Recipe

 

Photo: Liz Rueven

Photo: Liz Rueven

Katy Morris

Are you still swooning over summer’s abundance of fresh bounty at your farmers’ market?

One of our favorites just made its seasonal debut, and luckily, this versatile fruit will keep us busy in the kitchen right into autumn. When it comes to August aubergines, we’re all in.

 Wait, a fruit?!

Yep. Aubergines, more commonly known as eggplants, are part of the allusive nightshade family, just like tomatoes and potatoes.  They’re usually cooked just like and alongside other hearty veggies but indeed are technically fruits.

 

What’s up with all the different kinds?

 

There’s no need to succumb to the waxy, puffy purple bulbs that you can get year round at your supermarket – head out (if you haven’t already) to the local farmers’ market and see the  different types flourishing right now.

 

Need some help navigating ‘em?  No prob. Here is a quick rundown of some varieties:

 

  • American Eggplants: Otherwise known as globe eggplants, are the familiar round dark purple ones you’re bound to encounter at your market. They can grow up to 12 inches long but keep in mind that usually the smaller the eggplant, the sweeter it will be.

 

photo: Liz Rueven

photo: Liz Rueven

  • Oriental Eggplants: These guys are typically long and slender (although can vary in shape). Japanese eggplants boast a glossy dark purple coat whilst Chinese ones are a brighter violet. Their flavor is relatively mild and they’re often cooked with their thin skin on in stir-fries (the spongy texture soaks up soy, ginger or miso super well) or are delish when stuffed and baked. They’re growing ever more popular these days, particularly since they have thin skin and fewer seeds – hence are less bitter – than other varieties.

 

Photo: Liz Rueven

Photo: Liz Rueven

  • Indian Eggplants: This kind is tender and sweet and is usually a reddish-purple color with a round, small shape. They are typically used in classic vegetarian curries.

 

  • White Eggplants: So where do ya think the eggplant got its name? Yep, this kind! And they do indeed look like large, white – you guessed it – eggs.  They have a tough skin with a fantastic, fleshy white, sweet interior and hold up particularly well on the grill.

 

Photo: Liz Rueven

Photo: Liz Rueven

  • Italian: This is the variety you likely picture when you think of your standard eggplant. They’re nice and plump, beautifully purple and are also perfect on the summer grill (tips on grilling ‘em below) like globes. They’ll give you a lot of creamy flesh to work with – perfect for a Baba Ganoush dip to enjoy in the backyard.

 

  • Grafitti: This uniquely violet and ivory striped variety has a pretty similar earthy taste and meaty texture to your standard Italian one and can be used in the same ways as them when cooking, too. Try them in this Imam Bayeldi recipe!

 

photo: Liz Rueven

photo: Liz Rueven

 

 

How should I pick?

As always, ask the vendor at the farmers’ market for their advice. In general, go with blemish-free, smooth, firm eggplants that are heavy for their size (regardless of variety). For your typical globe eggplants, give them a knock before buying – it should be solid and not sound hollow.

Then, give it a gentle squeeze – an eggplant that has a little give when pushed on but then springs back means it’s ripe (versus one that remains dented). Note that overripe eggplants are much bitter in taste and can be super spongy (overly so) inside!

 

Cooking tips?

Stuffed, grilled, roasted, baked…ay, there are so many great ways to enjoy this fruit, so don’t be afraid to get creative! Just keep in mind no matter which method you use that the texture is super meaty and it soaks sauces, liquids and spices up very easily. In most cases, you can swap in eggplants instead of Portobello mushrooms, zucchini or okra.

Here are some top tips:

Photo: Liz Rueven

Photo: Liz Rueven

 

Roasting: Typically you’ll roast eggplant whole before you whip it into a dip. We recommend jabbing a fork into it several times to let it breathe before roasting (skin on). Kosher Like Me Contributor Melissa Roberts advises to first “score the flesh in a crosshatch pattern, then to coat with oil. This cut allows the flesh to soak up the oil all the way through, and with eggplant you always need way more than you think [as] it’s such an ‘oil sponge’.

 

Grillin’: The same crosshatch tip for prepping eggplants for grilling is the same as for roasting, according to Melissa. Skin on or off is your choice (we prefer it on, but sometimes it can get a bit tough). After slicing, brush both sides with extra virgin olive oil and season before putting it on the grill. It should only take 3-4 minutes on each side for it to get slightly browned. Then, wrap in tin foil to let them finish cooking all the way through.

 

Photo: Liz Rueven

Photo: Liz Rueven

To salt or not to salt?

Traditionally, cooks sprinkle salt on their sliced eggplants and “sweat” them in a colander to draw out bitterness before cooking. Today, everyone seems to have their own opinion, so we consulted with Melissa who says she hasn’t “noticed any pronounced benefits from salting other than the downside of rinsing, squeezing and drying salted eggplant.”

And since you’re like going to be seasoning your eggplant in one way or another when cooking here’s what we think:

Don’t sweat it!

 

Storage tips?

Eggplants do not like the cold – so it’s best to keep your freshly bought ones at room temperature to avoid damage to its texture and flavor. Did you overload on eggplants at the market? Save some for later! f you need to pop some in your freezer, blanch slices for a few minutes and let cook. Then pop in freezer bags after wrapping loosely in wax paper and in the freezer they go.

 

What else should I know?

Like we said, don’t be afraid to get creative when it comes to cooking eggplant.

Melissa let us know about her fantastic Eggplant Tarte Tartin with Black Pepper Caramel recipe, which is a super way to incorporate this fruit into a sweet and savory dessert! They also are fantastic paired with some of our favorite spices including garlic, cumin, harissa and much more.

Photo: Liz Rueven

Photo: Liz Rueven

Check out Leticia SchwartzMoroccan Eggplant Salad below. With eggplant in season from now through late September, you’ll have plenty of time to enjoy this one!

Moroccan Eggplant Salad

6-8 servings

 Moroccan Eggplant Salad

This eggplant salad melds Middle Eastern flavors with the summer's best eggplant and tomatoes. It is best prepared a day or two before serving.

Thank you Leticia Schwartz, the Brazilian Foodie, for this recipe.

This salad is pareve (dairy-free), vegan, gluten-free

Ingredients

  • 2 medium eggplants, about ¾ lb each
  • ½ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1 tablespoon crushed garlic
  • 1 lb tomatoes, peeled, halved, seeded and chopped
  • Tiny pinch sugar
  • ¾ teaspoon ground cumin
  • ½ teaspoon sweet paprika
  • 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 red pepper, seeded, peeled and chopped
  • 2 tablespoons capers, drained
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped cilantro
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped parsley
  • 1-2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

Instructions

  1. Center a rack in the middle of the oven. Pre-heat oven at 375 degrees farenheit.
  2. Halve each eggplant lengthwise.
  3. Brush the flesh with 4 tablespoons of olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Place them cut side down on a baking sheet lined with foil.
  4. Roast until tender, and golden brown, about 20 minutes. Remove from the oven, peel while stil hot and allow the flesh to drain in a colander over a bowl. Discard the dripping juices.
  5. Meanwhile, heat 3 tablespoons of the olive oil in a medium nonstick pan over medium heat.
  6. Add the garlic and cook until it just starts to turn golden, about 1 minute.
  7. Add the tomatoes, sugar, cumin, paprika, cayenne, and salt, and cook, stirring occasionally for 20 minutes.
  8. Chop the eggplant roughly and add to the skillet; continue cooking, stirring often, until thick, about 10 to 15 minutes more.
  9. Transfer to a bowl and stir in the red pepper, capers, cilantro, parsley, and lemon juice to taste. Let it cool, then cover and refrigerate overnight.
  10. Return the salad to room temperature and toss with the remaining olive oil before serving

Notes

This salad makes a tasty chilled or room temp appetizer alongside other Middle Eastern dishes. Consider serving it with hummus and chopped vegetable salad with feta cheese.

Or consider serving it as a companion to grilled fish or chicken, with a simple grain like brown rice, quinoa or freekah. This salad has plenty of flavors to season any prepared grains.

http://kosherlikeme.com/recipes/seasonal-snippet-eggplant-moroccan-eggplant-salad