Photo: Liz Rueven

Photo: Liz Rueven

When Florence Fabricant, longtime food critic for the New York Times, mentioned a newly opened Brazilian bakery in NYC that creates guava and cheese babke swirls I was all lit up I guessed that the roots of  Padoca’s treats, including challah french toast and black and white brownies, extended beyond Sao Paolo.

Indeed, owner Marina Halpern, grew up in a tight knit and vibrant Jewish community in Sao Paolo. When she was 11, she converted to Judaism in order to study for her Bat Mitzvah with her classmates at Hebrew day school. After arriving in NYC, she trained at the French Culinary Institute (now ICC) and cooked at the Dutch and the Mark before heading to London for a stint at a cafe known equally for creative dishes and customer service.

Marina Halpern and  chef/baker Rachel Binder (who baked at Maialino, Tabla and Savoy)  are a dynamic duo, pooling their talents and cultures in this bright spot on the corner of 68th St. and First Ave.

 

Photo: Liz Rueven

Photo: Liz Rueven

Halpern and Binder’s partnership solidified about a year before Padoca opened, when they began working on a vision and recipes together.  They dreamt about a friendly neighborhood bakery/cafe in the spirit of those found in Sao Paolo. And with whimsical touches like a swing instead of a stool in one corner, pendant lights suspended like illuminated teapots, and plenty of free reading for kids and adults, they’ve succeeded in carving out a new neighborhood hot spot.

They focused on traditional sweets from Halpern’s native Brazil and heavily influenced by Binder’s passion for Israeli ingredients and flavors combinations.

Chef/Baker Rachel Binder Photo: Liz Rueven

Chef/Baker Rachel Binder
Photo: Liz Rueven

When I visited them for a tasting, the guava and cheese babke swirls were on the cooling rack wafting tropical scents across the glass fronted bakery case brimming with swirls of cinnamon and chocolate and gleaming dulce de leche . But the combination that had enticed me initially was with cream cheese, ricotta and guava.

This combo is so classic- so perfect- that it’s called Romeo and Juliet. And lucky for us, you can find Binder’s recipe for this gooey treat, below.

 Other standouts were Empadinhas- a pot pie of sorts, traditionally made with chicken and hearts of palm, tastes like a cousin to Israeli borekas. Binder changed the traditional empadinhas dough from a flaky layered crust to more of a pot pie dough- lending heft to the casing for fillings like tomato and hearts of palm or mushroom with onion and dill.

Photo: Liz Rueven

Photo: Liz Rueven

Binder’s influence smacks of Eastern European flavor combinations she grew up with as she was surrounded by her Mom and two grandmothers. She cites all three as fabulous cooks who were always simmering soups and constantly baking treats of all kinds. But as an American girl living in Jerusalem for all of her youth, she was also deeply influenced by Middle Eastern flavors, too.

Don’t miss her salads in the take-out case in the front. She leans heavily towards vegetarian combinations expressed in dishes like Lentil and Bulgur Salad with goat cheese, red pepper, parsley and mint.  Middle Eastern flavors appear too, with simply seasoned Chick Peas marinated in fragrant EVOO, lemon, red onion and garlic.

Sandwiches lean towards Jewish classics like Smoked Salmon, cream cheese, pickled onions and capers on Pumpernickel or easy vegan combos like Roasted Red Peppers, tomatoes and sprouts on yeasty, whole grain Pullman.

Halpern also credits her Mom with inspiring many of the recipes at Padoca, including the Challah French Toast. They soak the bakery’s whole wheat challah  in coconut, condensed and whole milks and then bake it to sweet perfection each morning.

It’s worth eating full fat everything sometimes.

 

Photo: Liz Rueven

Photo: Liz Rueven

Binder bakes whole wheat challah every Friday. It’s smaller than expected, as per requests from young patrons in the neighborhood. The challah is slightly sweet and nutty and flecked with white and black sesame seeds. It’s pareve (non-dairy) and available on Fridays/Saturdays. Consider ordering larger sizes and rounds for upcoming holidays.

Breakfast treats abound, too, with shiny, glazed pastries like Red Pepper Brioche and Egg Brioche with Cheese.

Photo: Liz Rueven

Photo: Liz Rueven

Salty/ sweet combinations are perfect on summer mornings.

Photo: Liz Rueven

Photo: Liz Rueven

  

Halpern credits her Mom as inspiration for Padoca’s signature Bolo de Coco, or Coconut Cake.

Photo: Liz Rueven

Photo: Liz Rueven

Citrusy lemon tang infuses the cake with moisture while the original recipe has been tweaked by Binder to include cassava flour for better texture.

Brazilian classics are here for those who know the culture. Pao de queijo (called PDQ) are light cheese breads and are always available.

Wash it all down with Nobletree Coffee, grown in Brazil and roasted in Red Hook, Brooklyn. Palais de Thes provides the teas and freshly pressed juices are available for those yearning for drinkable fruits and veggies.

Photo: Liz Rueven

Photo: Liz Rueven

Monkey Swirls are irresistible with layers of moist dough wrapped around nutty, cinnamon flecked swirls. You’ll find chocolate and dulce de leche, too.

Clever riffs on NY classic black and whites appear in treats like these Black and White Brownies. I’ve been dreaming of serving them alongside juicy summer raspberries.

Photo: Liz Rueven

Photo: Liz Rueven

Enjoy Chef Rachel Binder’s recipe for Guava and Cheese Swirls, below. She’s made it easy to whip this up at home.

Padoca Bakery

359 E. 68th St. , corner of First Ave., NYC

M-F 7 AM-7 PM

Sat./Sun. 8 AM-6 PM

212-249-8085

Note: Padoca Bakery has many vegetarian options for readers who are Kosher Like Me. It is NOT a kosher bakery.

Romeo and Juliet Babke Swirls

Romeo and Juliet Babke Swirls

This rich cream cheese, ricotta and guava babke recipe is courtesy of Chef Rachel Binder, Padoca Bakery, NYC. It is called Romeo and Juliet because the flavors are perfect together!

Note that the dough needs to be refrigerated overnight before completing this recipe.

This babke is dairy.

Ingredients

    Dough
  • 4 1/4 cups All Purpose flour, plus extra for dusting
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 teaspoons instant yeast
  • Grated zest of 1 small lemon
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1/2 cup water and up to 1 to 2 tablespoons extra, if needed
  • 1 teaspoon table salt
  • 2/3 cup unsalted butter at room temperature
  • For the filling:
  • 8 oz. guava paste
  • Cheese Filling
  • 1 package (8 oz.) cream cheese
  • 1 10.5 oz. package goat cheese
  • zest of 1 lemon
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Instructions

  1. Combine the flour, sugar, yeast and zest in the bowl of a stand mixer.
  2. Add eggs and 1/2 cup water, mixing with the dough hook until it comes together, this may take a few minutes. If it doesn’t come together add extra water, 1 tablespoon at a time, until the dough forms a ball.
  3. With the mixer on low, add the salt, then the butter, a little at a time, mixing until it’s incorporated into the dough. Then, mix on medium speed for 10 minutes until dough is completely smooth, scraping down the sides of the bowl a few times. The dough should pull away from the sides of the bowl. If it doesn’t, add 1 tablespoon extra flour until it does.
  4. Divide dough into 2 discs, wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight.
  5. Roll dough into a 15x11 rectangle. Spread with guava jam. Then spread with cheese filling (see instructions below).
  6. Roll the dough up with the filling into a long, tight log. Transfer the log to a lightly floured baking tray and freeze for 10 to 15 minutes. Slice the log into 1” pieces and place in cavities of muffin tin. Repeat with second dough.
  7. Cover with a damp tea towel and allow to rise 1 - 1 1/2 hours at room temperature.
  8. Heat oven to 375°F.
  9. Remove towels. Brush each “swirl” with egg wash (1 egg and 1 egg yolk).
  10. Bake for approximately 30 minutes.
  11. Prepare the Cheese Filling
  12. Beat cream cheese with lemon zest very well until smooth.
  13. Add goat cheese, sugar and vanilla extract and beat well.
  14. Add egg and beat to combine.
http://kosherlikeme.com/on-the-road/swooning-over-babke-swirls-at-padoca-bakery

 

 

Photo: Leticia Schwartz

Photo: Leticia Schwartz

Chayote, also called vegetable pear, mirliton or christophine, begs to be pickled.

Say, What???

We’re starting off our pickle week with chayote because we loved learning that it receives brine like a welcoming sponge (a good thing) due to it’s high water content and mild flavor. Classified as a gourd, Chayote is a kissing cousin to cucumbers, also gourds.

And yes, for sure, we’ll be posting a simple pickled cuke recipe later this week.

Adobe stock

Adobe stock

And yes, we just love any excuse to explore unfamiliar ingredients.

Our Brazilian foodie friend, Leticia Schwartz, grew up eating lots of chayote in her family’s kitchen. Her Mom simply sautéed it in butter with a little salt and pepper and a few drops of water. Because of it’s crisp, smooth texture and indistinctive flavor, chayote is often simmered in curries and soups, or julienned and tossed with beets and cabbage in a raw slaw. It’s a great raw addition to fruit salads, too.

Leticia recommends using gloves to protect hands from a sticky fluid that oozes from the chayote. She then peels the vegetable pear using a vegetable peeler, slices the gourd in half and carves out the the core and pits before slicing it.

Watch for more about pickling and fermentation later this week.  We’ll be sharing inspiration from Sandor Katz, aka Sandorkraut, fermentation revivalist extraordinaire, and James Beard award winner.  If you want to know why you should consider pickling and fermenting, what the health benefits are, and how utterly simple it is, check back in on Thursday.

Thank you, Leticia Schwartz, for this Pickled Chayote recipe.

Easy Pickled Chayote

Pickled chayote is an easy and wonderful way to explore this pear shaped, pale vegetable.

Chayote is also referred to as mirliton, christophine and vegetable pear.

Thank you, Leticia Schwartz, for this recipe.

These pickles are vegan and pareve (non-dairy)

Ingredients

  • 2 cups distilled white vinegar
  • 1 small yellow onion, thinly sliced
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 2 whole cloves
  • 1 star anise
  • 1 teaspoon coriander seeds
  • 2 tablespoons Kosher salt
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 2 chayottes, pitted and cut into slices (see photo)

Instructions

  1. In a medium saucepan, combine the white vinegar, yellow onion, garlic, whole cloves, star anise, coriander seeds, salt and sugar.
  2. Bring to a boil, just to dissolve the salt and turn off the heat.
  3. Add the chayotte and let it cool completely.
  4. Transfer everything to a sterilized jar and refrigerate for at least 1 hour or up to 3 days.

Notes

Chayote may be found year-round in Latino and Asian markets or in the vegetable section of large markets with broad offerings.

http://kosherlikeme.com/recipes/easy-pickled-chayote

 

 

Originally Posted in “Easy Pickled Chayote
Photo: Liz Rueven

Photo: Liz Rueven

Shakshuka, a North African one-skillet, vegetarian dish, is basically eggs dropped into tomato sauce and baked until yolks firm up to your liking.

But there are as many riffs on this dish as there are cooks in the kitchen. So we’re sharing our most basic and favorite version here and you can add or subtract ingredients as you like.

Use the freshest eggs you can find and their richness will shine here. You’ll love the  bold flavors as they come together, first on the stovetop and then in the oven. 

photo: Liz Rueven

photo: Liz Rueven

Once I received my 15 inch cast iron pan as a gift from SC last year, I began fantasizing about the many variations of shakshuka I would simmer/bake in it.  YUP.  That’s how delicious this dish is. And relax; any oven-proof pan will do just fine.

With this basic recipe as your starting point, feel free to add in any of the following:

Greens: beet greens, kale, chopped collard greens, spinach.

Other veggies: cubed or thinly sliced potatoes (par-boiled), fried eggplant (diced or sliced), sliced mushrooms, red or yellow peppers, zucchini, fresh tomatoes

Cheese: feta, mozzarella or any other cheese that melts nicely

Spices: cilantro, parsley, cumin, fresh garlic, thyme, saffron threads, jalapeno peppers, freshly cracked pepper.

What’s your riff on shakshuka? Let us know in the comment section below.

 

Shakshuka

8 servings

Shakshuka

Shakshuka is a flexible dish so feel free to be creative. Add feta or mozzarella cheese once the eggs are in the pan if you like things cheesy. Add other veggies like diced zucchini, mushrooms or chopped fresh tomatoes if you like your sauce chunky.

This recipe is vegetarian and pareve (non-dairy)

Ingredients

  • 3 Tb. olive oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 can (28 oz.) crushed tomatoes
  • 2 tsp. tomato paste
  • ½ tsp. cumin
  • ½ tsp. paprika
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 c. fresh spinach
  • 8 eggs
  • parsley for garnish

Instructions

  1. In a heavy, deep sided pan (cast iron is great here), heat oil and saute onions for 8-10 minutes until they are well cooked but not brown.
  2. Add garlic and cook for 3-4 minutes.
  3. Add crushed tomatoes, tomato paste and all seasoning. Simmer on low for 10 minutes.
  4. Crack eggs into individual cups, making sure to leave yolks intact.
  5. With the back of a tablespoon, make a shallow well in the sauce for each egg and slide the egg gently into the sauce. Repeat until all eggs are in the pan.
  6. Gently tuck spinach around the eggs and allow all to simmer 5-7 minutes. Cook until whites have firmed up a bit but yolks are still runny.
  7. Garnish with chopped fresh parsley and serve with a large spoon.

Notes

Enjoy pita, challah or any good bread with this sauce. The runny yolks beg to be mopped up. If you are ok with the spinach disappearing into the sauce, add spinach to sauce about 2 minutes before adding eggs. Stir well and drop eggs in. Feel free to adjust spices if you like a little more heat.

http://kosherlikeme.com/recipes/shakshuka-perfect-at-any-time

Originally Posted in “Shakshuka; Perfect at any Time
Photo: Liz Rueven

Photo: Liz Rueven

We’re so excited about seeing all sorts of cherries in the farmers’ markets!  We would NEVER leave you pining for a great recipe!

Lazy bones who are lucky enough to live in CT can march themselves into SoNo Baking Company and pick this deliciousness up directly from John Barricelli’s bakery (consider ordering ahead, as I did). For the rest of you baker-types out there, this Sweet Cinnamon Focaccia with Cherries and Grapes is a moist, yeasty square with plenty of fruit in every nook and cranny. Trust me, you’ll want to make this.

Consider this focaccia dough as a starting point for other seasonal pastries, too. Check out Barricelli’s The Seasonal Baker to see how farm fresh ingredients can be your inspiration for baking in all four seasons.

Thanks, John, for sharing this recipe with us here.

For everything you might want to know about cherries- where to pick ‘em anywhere in the USA, how to pit them, and which varieties to use in your recipes, scroll down or click into this month’s Seasonal Snippet here.

 

Sweet Cinnamon Focaccia with Cherries & Grapes

makes approximately 1 dozen squares

Sweet Cinnamon Focaccia with Cherries & Grapes

This recipe is from THE SEASONAL BAKER by John Barricelli, with permission from the author.

From John, " I've been making a sweet, cinnamon-scented focaccia with dried fruit for years. It's a favorite with my kids, who clamor for it for breakfast. This is an adaptation of that recipe topped with fresh fruit and sanding sugar. It's a treat for breakfast but you may also like to make it for dessert as an open-faced fruit pie with a great, yeasty crust. The addition of sugar in the dough makes it softer and less crispy. "

This recipe is pareve (non-dairy), egg free (vegan)

Ingredients

    Focacccia Dough
  • 1 3/4 cups warm (105-110 degrees fahrenheit) water
  • 1 1/2 tsp active dry yeast
  • 3 1/2 cups plus 2 TB all-purpose flour
  • 4 1/2 tsp course salt
  • 2 TB plus 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1/2 C granulated sugar
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • Topping
  • 1 C pitted, halved fresh cherries
  • 1 C halved fresh red grapes
  • 1 C halved fresh green grapes
  • 2 TB olive oil
  • 3 TB sanding sugar

Instructions

    Make the dough
  1. In a small bowl, combine 1/4 cup of the warm water with the yeast and let proof for about 5 minutes.
  2. In a very large bowl, stir together all of the flour and salt, granulated sugar and cinnamon.
  3. Make a well in the center.
  4. When the yeast has proofed, pour it into the well along with the remaining 1 1/2 cups water and 2 TB of the oil, setting aside the remaining 1/2 cup of oil.
  5. Using a plastic pastry scraper, gradually pull the flour into the yeast mixture, folding to mix, until a very wet dough forms.
  6. Knead the dough in the bowl for 5 minutes by folding the dough over itself with the plastic pastry scraper while you turn the bowl.
  7. Scrape the dough out onto a clean work surface.
  8. Wash and dry the bowl.
  9. Smear the bottom of the bowl with olive oil.
  10. Scrape up the dough with the plastic scraper, return it to the bowl and turn to coast with the oil.
  11. Cover with an oiled sheet of plastic wrap.
  12. Let the dough stand in a warm place (at least 70 degrees fahrenheit) for about 1 1/2 hours or until the volume increases by 1 1/2 times.
  13. Make the topping
  14. In a large bowl, toss the cherries and grapes with the olive oil.
  15. Continue
  16. Coat a 17 by 12 inch rimmed baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray.
  17. Add the 1/2 cup of olive oil.
  18. Use a plastic scraper to turn the dough out onto the oiled baking sheet.
  19. Flip the dough so that the oiled side is up.
  20. Press the dough out to the edges of the pan with your fingertips until the dough fills the baking sheet and is dimpled all over.
  21. If the dough contracts, set it aside fro 10 minutes to relax, and try again.
  22. Cover with oiled plastic wrap and let rise until puffy and increased about 1 1/2 times in bulk, 30-45 minutes.
  23. Set the oven rack in the lower third of the oven and preheat oven to 450 degrees fahrenheit
  24. Scatter the fruit over the dough and sprinkle with sanding sugar.
  25. The dough will have deflated somewhat; set aside to rise again for 20 minutes.
  26. Bake, rotating the sheet about two-thirds of the way through the baking time, until the focaccia is evenly golden on top and bottom, about 30 minutes.
  27. Immediately, slide the focaccia onto a wire rack.
  28. Cut into squares and serve warm or at room temperature.
http://kosherlikeme.com/recipes/sweet-cinnamon-focaccia-with-cherries-grapes

 

 

Photo courtesy of Marcia Selden Catering

Photo courtesy of Marcia Selden Catering

Miso is a flavorful and healthy ingredient that’s easy to cook with – made from fermented soybeans, it’s packed with healthy benefits like amino acids, vitamin B and also aids in digestion. Many people are familiar with miso in soup recipes, but you can use it in salads, to roast veggies and to elevate fish to a whole new level.

Check out these recipes for Miso Marinated Black Cod and Sweet Potatoes Glazed with Miso and Tehini (scroll to next post for recipe).

They’re both perfect for summer—light and full of flavor!

 

Know Your Miso:

There are several types of Miso, here’s a quick breakdown of their flavor profiles:

White Miso (Shiro Miso)~Known as ‘sweet’ or ‘mellow’ miso. It has a milder flavor that can be built on and is adaptable—great for soups and veggies

Yellow Miso (Shinshu Miso)~Has a mild flavor profile and ranges in color from light yellow to light brown. This works well with soups and as a glaze.

Red Miso (Aka Miso)~Saltier than the other varietals. Has a more distinct flavor and is perfect for marinades or glazes and richer soups. It can sometimes overwhelm other ingredients in a dish, so you only need to use a small amount.

Miso Marinated Black Cod

4 servings

Make the marinade 2-3 days ahead of cooking the fish and half the work will be done!

This recipe is courtesy of Marcia Selden Catering, Stamford, CT.

This recipe is pareve (non-dairy)

Ingredients

  • ¼ cup Mirin
  • ¼ cup Sake
  • 4 Tbs. Shiro miso paste
  • 4 Tbs. Sugar
  • 3 Tbs. Diced Garlic
  • 4 Black Cod Filets, about ½ pound each
  • 2 Tbs. Sesame Oil
  • Toasted Sesame Seeds, for garnish
  • Sliced Green Onions, for garnish

Instructions

  1. Place mirin and sake into a small saucepan and bring to a simmer over medium heat to cook off the alcohol.
  2. Simmer for about 2 minutes and add miso and garlic, stir until combined. Stir in the sugar and sesame oil and remove from heat and allow it to cool.
  3. Pat the black cod fillets and dry them with paper towels, slather the fish with the cooled miso marinade and place it in a bowl or pan and cover with plastic wrap. The fish can marinate in the refrigerator for up to eight hours.
  4. When you’re ready to cook the fish, preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
  5. Remove excess miso from the fillets and place the fish skin-side up in a heated, lightly oiled pan and cook for three minutes each side to sear the outside to golden brown.
  6. Transfer to the oven and bake for 5-7 minutes
  7. Garnish with toasted sesame seeds and sliced green onions.
http://kosherlikeme.com/recipes/miso-magic-and-marinated-black-cod

 

 

 

 

Originally Posted in “Miso Magic and Marinated Black Cod
Photo: Liz Rueven

Photo: Liz Rueven

Later this week we’ll have helpful tips on the range of MISO types and when to use which of them where.

While you’re hanging on, here’s a recipe for roasted sweet potatoes with a surprising glaze that is sure to become a regular in your repertoire. Try it on carrots, cauliflower or turnips, too.

Last week, I popped diced bits of sweet potato in the oven as per Marcia Selden Catering‘s recipe. After roasting them, I allowed them to cool and glazed them with this simple mixture. I kinda forgot about them in my refrigerator until the weekend when I layered a couple of spoonsful over some chopped kale salad.

I was totally surprised at how complex and satisfying the flavors are.

While roasting the potatoes brings out their sweetness, the miso deepens the savory nuttiness of the tehini. The undertones in this super simple recipe are more yummy umami than I expected!

Use these as a side dish or a perfectly healthy salad topper.

Can’t say we didn’t warn ya. These are ADDICTIVE!

Roasted Sweet Potatoes with Miso Tehini Glaze

4 servings

Roasted Sweet Potatoes with Miso Tehini Glaze

Roasted sweet potatoes become more interesting with this unexpectedly nutty and slightly salty glaze. The potatoes are great warm or at room temperature. Serve as a side dish or on top of a pile of greens to add interest to your salad.

This recipe is courtesy of Marcia Selden Catering, Stamford, CT

This recipe is pareve (non-dairy) and vegan

Ingredients

  • 2 C. Diced and Peeled Sweet Potatoes
  • 1-2 Tbs. Olive Oil
  • Kosher Salt
  • 3 Tbs. White or Yellow Miso Paste
  • 3 Tbs. Tehini
  • 1 Tbs. Lemon Juice
  • 3/4 C. Water

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Place diced sweet potatoes in a single layer on a sheet pan, and drizzle with olive oil and salt.
  3. Roast for 25-30 minutes. Carefully turn halfway through the cooking time to ensure even browning.
  4. While the sweet potatoes roast, combine remaining ingredients to a saucepan and turn heat to medium-low.
  5. Whisk over low heat until smooth. Add a bit more water as needed.
  6. Drizzle potatoes with sauce before serving.

Notes

These glazed sweet potato bites are great as leftovers.

http://kosherlikeme.com/recipes/roasted-sweet-potatoes-with-miso-tehina-glaze

Spiced Sliders

Spiced Sliders

As summer grilling season is in full swing and 4th of July is approaching quickly, we jumped at the opportunity to check out some of Grow and Behold‘s premium ground meats. Anna Hanau, co-owner with husband Naftali, offered us recipes for burgers of all sorts, toppings and condiments perfect for summer get-togethers and plenty of tips on how to make the juiciest burgers sizzle.

While we most often cover vegetarian dishes in restaurant reviews and recipes we offer, summer feels like the right time to share some great new ideas for mixing different types of meats while using ingredients we don’t often turn to.

Grow and Behold raises animals with an extraordinary concern for a healthy ecosystem that includes healthy soil and plants, healthy animals and healthy people. Their pastured meats are raised on small family farms in the Northeast where the strictest standards of kosher, animal welfare, worker treatment and sustainable agriculture are top priority.

Anna and Naftali Hanau

Anna and Naftali Hanau

We trust that every step of the process has been cared for by this young company (founded in 2010) with a visionary young couple we have come to know. If you’re going to eat meat, this is meat worth eating.

Scroll down for recipes and use discount code KosherLikeMe if you chose to order from Grow and Behold. They’ll take $15.00 of your first order of $100 or more if you use it before July 15, 2015.

Here are some great tips Anna shared with us:

Making Patties: Be sure your meat is fully defrosted before handling. Use a light touch, being sure not to overwork or squish the meat. Patties will be dense and tough if you do. Form loose patties without concern for perfectly round or flat shapes. Uneven patties will yield crispy edges. Smaller patties tend to stay together a little better.

Serving Size: 4 oz. patties (four patties per pound of meat) means someone can opt for two and they cook more quickly. 5 oz. patties (three per pound) are best seared over high heat and then moved to a cooler part of the grill to finish cooking. Kabobs will yield about 8 per pound (two oz. each).

Mixing meat with new flavors:

Lighten with veal and glaze with a fruity sauce or dip

Intensify by adding lamb, while balancing with baharat, cumin, cinnamon or mint.

Mix it up by using ground turkey and chicken, especially the dark meat which makes a rich burger without eating red meat. With ground turkey and chicken, add sundried tomatoes, chopped olives, water chestnuts, currants or cranberries to keep the mixture moist.

For more information on how Grow and Behold’s beef, lamb and Rose Veal are raised and pastured click here. Check their website for more ideas on how to use different cuts of meats, chicken and turkey. They have a recipe for every cut they offer!

Beef- Veal Burgers with Balsamic Cherries

Beef- Veal Burgers with Balsamic Cherries

This recipe allows the flavors of the meat to shine. Serve with balsamic cherries or mango salsa.

Recipe by Anna Hanau

This recipe is meat

Ingredients

    Burgers
  • 1lb Ground Pastured Beef
  • 1lb Ground Rose Veal
  • Balsamic Cherries (or Strawberries)
  • 1 cup ripe bing cherries, washed, pitted and roughly chopped
  • 2-3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper, or more to taste
  • 1 teaspoon sugar, or more to taste

Instructions

  1. Combine meat gently and form into patties. Grill or pan-fry.
  2. Combine cherries with other ingredients and muddle fruit slightly.
  3. Let sit 20 minutes while you cook the burgers until flavor melds.
http://kosherlikeme.com/recipes/mix-it-up-with-meat-thats-worth-eating

Spiced Sliders with Date Ketchup

Spiced Sliders with Date Ketchup

Recipe adapted from Abigail Street, Bon Appetit (http://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/spiced-sliders-with-date-ketchup)

This recipe is meat.

Ingredients

    Sliders:
  • ½ small red onion, finely chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1 pound ground lamb
  • 8 oz. ground beef
  • ¼ cup finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 1 tablespoon baharat (spice blend)
  • Date Ketchup:
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • ½ small red onion, finely chopped
  • 1 cup ketchup
  • 1 cup Medjool dates, pitted, chopped
  • ½ cup pale lager
  • 2 tablespoons Plum Vinegar
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil

Instructions

    Make the Date Ketchup:
  1. Heat oil in a small saucepan over medium heat. Cook onion, stirring occasionally, until beginning to brown, 5–8 minutes.
  2. Add ketchup, dates, and beer; bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer, stirring occasionally and adding water as needed to prevent burning, until thick and slightly darkened, 20–25 minutes.
  3. Remove pan from heat and stir in vinegar.
  4. Let mixture cool slightly. Purée in a blender, thinning with water if needed, until smooth; season with salt and pepper. Let cool.
  5. Make the Sliders:
  6. Using your hands, gently mix onion, garlic, lamb, beef, parsley, and baharat in a large bowl
  7. season with salt and pepper.
  8. Form scant ¼-cupfuls of lamb mixture into twelve 2”-diameter patties.
  9. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat.
  10. Place patties in skillet and immediately reduce heat to medium.
  11. Cook about 3 minutes per side for medium-rare.
http://kosherlikeme.com/recipes/mix-it-up-with-meat-thats-worth-eating

Lamb Kabobs with Cumin

Lamb Kabobs with Cumin

Recipe by Rachel Rosen & Naftali Hanau

This recipe is meat.

Ingredients

  • 1 pound Grow and Behold Pastured Ground Beef
  • 1 pound Grow and Behold Pastured Ground Lamb
  • 2 tablespoons ground cumin
  • 1 large egg
  • 3 tablespoons ketchup
  • 1 tablespoon granulated garlic or 2-3 garlic cloves minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon white pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro

Instructions

  1. Mix all ingredients together.
  2. Shape into cigars – oblongs shapes about 3” long.
  3. Juice one lemon over meat cigars before grilling.
  4. Heat grill to hot.
  5. Spray grate with grill spray.
  6. Grill cigars until done to your likeness (we recommend medium/rare)

Notes

Kabobs pair perfectly with tehina!

http://kosherlikeme.com/recipes/mix-it-up-with-meat-thats-worth-eating

Photo: Liz Rueven

Photo: Liz Rueven

When The Nosher asked me to create a lentil-free veggie burger for summer BBQ’s I took the challenge on with gusto.

Check out this easy- on- your- tummy Sweet Potato Quinoa vegetarian burger on the Nosher here.

And while you’re there, enjoy the dairy free sides we’ve put together for you so that you can serve it all with more traditional meaty burgers at your next shindig.

Happy grilling!

 

Originally Posted in “Solution: This Veggie Burger
photo: Burning Bush

photo: Burning Bush

In advance of our round-up of favorite summer condiments for Father’s Day, we’d like to whet your whistle with this simple, thirst slacking, Burning Bush infused Burning Passion. Think: mid-week cocktail on the porch, in the park, or oceanside.

Not so hard, right?

Burning Bush, a versatile, kosher and gluten-free hot sauce, is a blend of organic tomato paste, chile peppers, white vinegar and a secret mix of herbs and spices from across three continents. It’s easy to use bottle is thoughtfully designed to cautiously dispense the heat one drop at a time, too.

Very wise.

Watch for our round-up of other favorite condiments on Thursday. We’ll have plenty of suggestions for how to spark your marinades, favorite hummus, grilled summer salads and all manners of simple dishes destined for outdoor dining.

The folks at Burning Bush are so excited about sharing their product with us, they’ve offered our readers a handy 10% discount when purchasing their hot sauce by clicking here . Simply insert code: KOSHERLIKEME for a your 10% discount.

 

Burning Passion

Burning Passion is a spicy blend of sweet and savory that'll leave you with a simmering smile and inner warmth. Warning: dispense drop by drop to control the heat.

Ingredients

  • 3 oz. Morad Passion Fruit Wine
  • 3 oz. Orange Juice
  • 1½ oz. Dark Rum
  • 1-2 tsp. Burning Bush

Instructions

  1. Combine all ingredients in a cocktail shaker with ice and shake vigorously.
  2. Strain into a cocktail glass with crushed ice.
  3. Garnish with an orange peel or wedge.

Notes

Other drinkable Burning ideas:

Alcohol free: Pour 5 oz. OJ, and 3 oz. tropical fruit juice over ice. Drop Burning Bush into glass until the burn feels just right.

Heat up your favorite shot of fine tequila, smokey scotch or dark bourbon with one teaspoon of Burning Bush.

Add Burning Bush to a traditional Mimosa.

Shake a few drops (you decide how much heat) into a classic Bloody Mary or a Bloody mocktail.

Enjoy the heat!

http://kosherlikeme.com/recipes/condiments-in-your-cocktails

Originally Posted in “Condiments in your Cocktails

 

photo: Liz Rueven

photo: Liz Rueven

If you’re lucky enough to live anywhere near a farm that grows strawberries, be sure to venture out to pick your own. When you tire of having sweet, ruby tinged juice staining your fingers, and you can tear yourself away from eating every other berry you bend to pick,  head home to bake these easy and classic strawberry shortcakes.

Thank you, Christy Colasurdo and Tracey Medeiros, for sharing this recipe from their just released cookbook, The Connecticut Farm to Table Cookbook;  150 Home-Grown Recipes from the Nutmeg State, June 2015. This beautifully photographed book is a celebration of the local and seasonal. Although it highlights CT. chefs, the recipes are suitable for all die-hard locavores anywhere. (Note: this cookbook has plenty of vegetarian and kosher friendly recipes within, but it is not a kosher cookbook).

This recipe was contributed by the chef at Barberry Hill Farm, Madison, CT.

 

Photo with permission of the author

Photo with permission of the author

 

 

Strawberry Shortcake

8 servings

Strawberry Shortcake

This recipe comes from Barberry Hill Farm, CT via THE CONNECTICUT FARM TO TABLE COOKBOOK; 150 HOMEGROWN RECIPES FROM THE NUTMEG STATE by Tracey Medeiros and Christy Colasurdo.

"Here’s what you can do with that bumper crop of ripe strawberries you scored at the farm."

This recipe is dairy.

Ingredients

    Biscuits
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 cup (1/2 stick, 2 ounces) unsalted butter, cut into pieces, chilled
  • 3/4 cup cold whole milk
  • Strawberries
  • 2 pounds strawberries, hulled and sliced
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1 1/2 to 2 cups whipped cream

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 450°F.
  2. To make the biscuits: In a large bowl, sift together the flour, baking powder, and salt.
  3. Using a fork or your fingertips, cut in the butter until the flour mixture resembles crumbs.
  4. Make a well in the center of the flour mixture and slowly pour in the milk.
  5. Stir until the dough just starts to come together. Do not overmix.
  6. Spoon or scoop about 1/4 cup of dough for each biscuit onto ungreased baking sheet.
  7. Press down gently on each biscuit. Bake until golden brown, about 15 minutes.
  8. Toss the strawberries with the sugar and refrigerate 30 minutes before serving.
  9. To serve: Cut the biscuits in half horizontally and spoon the strawberries and their juice over each shortcake bottom.
  10. Top each with whipped cream and then the shortcake top.
  11. Spoon more strawberries over the top and serve immediately.

Notes

Biscuits may be made ahead.

http://kosherlikeme.com/recipes/classic-strawberry-shortcake

 

 

 

Originally Posted in “Classic Strawberry Shortcake